Structural Insulated Panel
( SIP's )
Inside Corners
Structural Dormer
    Panelized walls provide a host of benefits for the builder or homeowner who utilizes them. They save time and money, use less materials, are far easier to install, and create better quality homes. Panelization is becoming increasingly popular.  Currently about 12% of homes in America are constructed using panelization and it is estimated that this will increase to 80% within 10 years.
  Structural Panels "SIPs" are high-performance building panels for floors, walls and roofs in residential and commercial buildings. Each panel is typically made using expanded polystyrene (EPS), or polyisocyanurate rigid foam insulation sandwiched between two structural skins of oriented strand board (OSB), but other surfaces are also available to meet your needs. The result is a building system that is very strong, predictable, energy efficient, and cost effective.
  Building with SIPs generally costs about the same as building with wood frame construction, when you factor in the labor savings resulting from shorter construction time and less job-site waste.
Other savings are realized because less expensive heating and cooling systems are required with SIP construction.
Structural Cupola
Roof Panel
Whole House

Structural Panels: High-quality foam core panels that are strong, energy-efficient, and suitable for many residential and commercial building applications.



Wood-Finished Structural Panels: Structural panels with the beauty of a natural wood finish.



Drywall-Clad Panels: One-piece components (sheet rock one side) suitable for use in walls and roofs of timber frame, post and beam, or log construction.


Nailbase Wall and Roof Panels: One-piece components suitable for the walls and roof  of timber frame, post and beam, or log construction.



Click on images to enlarge.
Inside Corner Detail
Hybrid
Structural Dormer
Why Use Structural Panels?
HOME BUILDING  WITH STRUCTURAL INSULATED PANELS

Oriented Strand Board (OSB)
Oriented Strand Board (OSB) is a panel made with layers of precision-manufactured wood
"strands" that are aligned, formed into panels and pressed with an exterior grade adhesive
resin. The resulting engineered product is a high-quality, cost-effective panel for structural
building components that delivers exceptional performance providing uniformity, strength
and versatility. OSB is fully engineered for strength and durability. That means each panel
is specifically designed and tested to meet or exceed stringent quality standards. OSB
has proven to be an economical and competitive structural panel made from a completely
renewable resource -- small-diameter, fast-growing trees.
Since its debut in the marketplace in 1978, OSB has been rapidly accepted. In many areas
of North America, OSB has virtually replaced other panels in residential construction.
Today, all model building codes in the U.S. and Canada recognize OSB panels for the
same uses as plywood on a thickness-by-thickness basis. OSB, as a performance-based
structural use panel, is recognized by all the major U.S. model code agencies through the
adoption of DOC PS2-92 Wood-Based Structural Use Panels. OSB, certified to CSA 0325
and CSA 0437, is accepted in the National Building Code of Canada. OSB certified to EN
300 is recognized for structural use in Europe. In Japan, North American OSB is certified to
meet the JAS standard for structural panels.



  Panels can be either 4’ or 8’ wide, and for length, they start at 8’ long and range up to 24’ long in increments of 2’, (8’, 10’, 12’, 14’, etc.). Panels are generally shipped to the job site on a flatbed truck. They are shipped either as whole "blanks" and cut on site or as pre-cut panels and installed like a fine jigsaw puzzle with minimal amounts of job site waste and even quicker erection time. Panels can be cut in a facility with more precision due to controlled site conditions. This also greatly minimizes waste materials on the job site. Panels can be cut to width, length and height with window and door openings as well as hip, valley and bevel cuts.


Strict new wind codes could provide SIP builders with a new competitive edge.

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